Conferences

Team Building According to Coach K

I recently attended MarketingProf’s Annual Conference and wanted to share some of my insights from this event – which I highly recommend.

On-the-Edge-SM_11151One of the keynotes was Alison Levine, the Captain of the First All-Women Mount Everest Expedition.  The story was incredible, and I encourage everyone to read the book, but I want to focus on only one story.  Alison was tasked with building a team of five women to hike to the highest point on Earth without dying.  How do you do that?

She called her friend, Coach Krzyzewski, the legendary Head Coach of Duke’s Basketball team and the USA Olympic Basketball team.  He said he looks for 1 thing when building a team – Ego.

Alison assumed he meant lack of ego, but he corrected her.  He wants two types of ego.

  1. Performance Ego – You want people who can walk on the court and have believe they have what it takes to win. You don’t want folks who are filled with self-doubt and question themselves constantly… Especially on a mountain.
  2. Team Ego – You want someone who is proud to be part of something collectively bigger than themselves.  They have to be happy in the team’s victory, even if they get none of the glory.

Maybe you’re building a marketing department for the first time.  Maybe you’re trying to find slot players to fill gaps.  For those of us who have been individual contributors for years and are not used to a “team” mentality, this can be difficult.  I have recently been promoted to run field marketing across all our regions.  The idea of building a team from scratch was an incredible opportunity, but I did wonder if I had what it takes to build the right one.

As we look for talent and encounter opportunities for growth I think we should challenge ourselves to follow Coach K’s advice.  Do we walk on the court and believe we have what it takes, while celebrating the successes of our team members?  Are we hiring team members who do the same?  I challenge you, and myself, to look for ego when hiring, but the right kind.

Thanks Coach.

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Women in Technology and Identifying Sponsors

I am planning for my upcoming quarter – as I tend to do.  While looking at events coming up next quarter that I want my product group involved in, I came across the Colorado Technology Association’s annual Women in Technology Conference.

My company, Zayo Group, is extremely involved with the Colorado Technology Association and is a proud sponsor of this conference.  I had the pleasure of attending this conference last year, with Zayo, and was blown away by the inspiring and incredible women I met there.

Speakers last year included the CFO of Comcast, VP of Analytics & Data Products at Ibotta, and VP of Risk Management & Managed Cloud Services at Oracle – among many others.  All of the speakers were incredible women who blew straight through the glass ceiling and are killing it in traditionally male fields.

This, of course, makes me think about marketing – which continues to leverage science more and more each year.  Marketing is largely even when it comes to gender ratios – which is really special.  I know I am fortunate to work in a field where my gender isn’t an issue at a company that values women’s contributions.  This is not always the case.

I wanted to share one of the takeaways from last year’s conference that stuck out to me, as many of you may not be as fortunate as I.

There is a difference between a mentor and a sponsor.

Madeleine Albright, former U.S. Secretary of State, once said, “There’s a special place in hell reserved for women who don’t help other women.”

There was a small panel discussion at this event that looked at exactly what the difference is between a mentor and a sponsor.  A mentor helps you along with advise and direction.  A sponsor pulls you up with them.  They help uncover opportunities for you to move up into.

While doing some research on this subject I stumbled upon a New York Times article on the very subject.  Sylvia Ann Hewlett, CEO of the Center for Talent Innovation in Manhattan and author of Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor writes, “To get ahead, women need to acquire a sponsor – a powerfully positioned companion – to help them escape the “marzipan layer,” that sticky middle slice of management where so many driven and talented women languish.”

She continues,

“Our two-year study, which sampled some 12,000 men and women in white-collar occupations across the United States and Britain, shows how sponsorship, unlike mentorship… makes a measurable difference in career progress… A sponsor can lean in on a woman’s behalf, apprising others of her exceptional performance and keeping her on the fast track.  With such a person – male or female – in her corner, our data shows, a woman is more likely to ask for a big opportunity, to seek a raise and to be satisfied with her rate of advancement.”

Hewlett does caution that sponsorship is a two-way street.  If someone’s going to stick their neck out for you, you’ve got to deliver fully every time.  You have to make them look good.  Otherwise you tarnish your brand and theirs.

At the conference, our table’s “luminary”, Roberta Robinette President — AT&T Colorado, lead a discussion about what the panel covered and stated that all of the sponsors in her career have been men – never women.    I think she had a point.  The only true sponsor I have ever had was a former male vice president.  That’s it.

How often are we really building each other up?  Not just emotionally, but professionally?  Rather than fighting to be the only woman at the table, why don’t we fight together?  It just seems a lot more productive if you ask me.

Tradeshow 101: Be the Party

Each year thousands of people flock to Las Vegas, Orlando, New Orleans and hundreds of other cities to attend conventions.  For them, it is the highlight of their year.  Every day they grind through their 9 to 5 – working well more than 40 hours a week.

But once a year their company sends them to some convention where they are expected to ignore their email and learn something.  But for the attendee this is half learning – half vacation.

So why would anyone want to talk to this guy on their vacation?

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As the one running the booth it is your job to be the party.  People want to hang out with the fun people.  Don’t be boring.

Here are a few things I do in order to attract those looking to have fun:

  1. No cell phones.  Put them away.  You don’t need them.  Whatever it is can wait.  Your company has dropped thousands of dollars on this event.  Be present and hide your phone.
  2. Get a song stuck in your head.  If you have a fun song stuck in your head it will keep your energy up.  The faster the tempo, the better.  I actually dance at my booths to the song in my head.  People give me weird looks, but it’s usually like “I want whatever she’s having.”  Their on vacation.  Why wouldn’t they?  You would not believe how many people will walk up and start dancing with me without an invite.  My go to is “Conga” by Miami Sound Machine.  Find one that works for you.
  3. Smile.  It seems like a simple thing, but I see it all the time.  People flew across the country to represent their company at the conference and they look miserable.  No one wants to party with the depressed guy who only smiles when you walk up.  Smile like you’re having the time of your life and people will literally cross the room to say hi.

Remember, they’re there to learn and blow off some steam.  So be the party and they will come to you.

And now, for some dancing inspiration…

Tradeshow 101: The Most Important Thing to Buy for Your Booth

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“Dear Hannah,

I am a marketing manager with a non-existing budget.  This year my company wants us to have a booth at a major industry tradeshow.  We have a tabletop, backdrop and podium.  It’s enough to fill up a 10×20.  With limited funds I’m not really sure where to put the bulk of it?  Should I invest in giveaways or a better booth or something else?  If giveaways, what are your favorites?

Sincerely,
Tabitha”

Tabitha,
Tradeshows happen to be one of my favorite topics.  In fact, in response to your email I’m going to write a series on my top tradeshow tips.

I know all too well how expensive tradeshows are and how unrealistic marketing budgets can be.

Here is hands down, the #1 most important thing you should buy for your booth:

Carpet Padding.

Image result for carpet padding tradeshow

It is the most under utilized, under valued and most important thing a marketer can spend money on for their booth.  More than giveaways, more than the booth itself, more than collateral… carpet padding is king.  And best of all, it’s cheap.

Carpet Padding can accomplish 4 critical things:

  1. Entice people to come to your booth
  2. Entice people to stay at your booth
  3. Keep your team’s energy up
  4. Make you look like an event marketing genius

1. Entice People to Come to Your Booth

Let me paint a picture for you.

Image result for professional woman outfit plusKelly works in an office and rarely gets to do something fun as part of her job.  Maybe she travels to other offices, but it’s rarely a good time.  For the most part she works at her desk, rarely has time to eat or exercise properly, and hardly ever gets to rub elbows with her company’s executives.

Her company decides that she will join several others at a conference in Las Vegas – now they’re talking!  She will be joining her VP and a few directors.  She decides to pack her cutest, professional outfits – which include heels.  Kelly doesn’t think about the fact that she’ll have to walk a mile from her hotel room to the convention hall.  She doesn’t realize the convention call is all concrete slightly covered by carpeting.  It never occurs to her that 3,000 exhibitors means spending an entire day on her feet in the exhibitor hall.  After 2 hours, her feet and back are killing her – and she has another 3 days of this.

Then Kelly walks past your booth and you complement her on her amazing heels and state Image result for feet are killing you“… but your feet must be killing you!  Come enjoy some carpet padding.”  She will shake your outstretched hand and come join you on the carpet, just to be polite.
Then Kelly’s eyes light up.  OMG!  Double carpet padding is instant relief.  Triple carpet padding feels like a cloud.

It sounds crazy, but it works 4 out of 5 times.  This is true of men and women alike.  Men’s shoes can be just as terrible, especially when you’re carrying a few extra pounds and are not used to this much walking.

2. Entice People to Stay at Your Booth

When they feel that relief, they are instantly in a better mood and are happy to listen to your elevator pitch.  If you opt for the triple padding, some people may actually take their shoes completely off.

They will tell you their life story for 3 minutes of relief from their feet and back.  Then you can better qualify them at the booth and hand them over to a nearby sales rep who can more expertly answer their question.

If people are running away from your booth, chances are you haven’t given them a good reason to stay.

3. Keep Your Team’s Energy Up

Image result for ready okayNo one should be sitting at the booth.  It is a hard rule at my events.  No one sits.

It is exhausting smiling, standing and being completely “on” for 8 hours 3 days in a row.  I get it.  If you expect your team to be “on” and on their feet, pay for the extra carpet padding.  Chances are they didn’t pack the right shoes either.  They will thank you.

4. Make You Look Like an Event Marketing Genius

geniusMarketing gets a bad rap for spending too much money (see a previous post on the topic), but you can reverse that when you demonstrate how much traffic you’re bringing in without having the nicest booth and coolest gadgets.  Point out to your team how other booths are not doing the same thing.  They have the coolest booth in the world and people are picking up their goody and leaving.  No valuable conversations at all.

When you’re team observes this, you can point out that you spent 1/3 of what the others did and we’ll probably get double the traffic.

You’ll look like a genius.  You’re welcome.

If anyone has any marketing questions feel free to email me at hlhoward71@hotmail.com.  I’m all ears and you may get a shout out on the blog.

 

How I Overcame My Professional Burnout

Do you wake up, remember that its a workday and silently start cussing out your entire management chain in your head?  Do you walk into the office, turn on your computer, see that you have 74 unread messages and imagine beating up tourists?  Are you going to scream bloody murder the next time someone says “Can you help me design this PowerPoint for a meeting?  You’re just so good at it”?

No? Just me?

Image result for jerry maguire leaves the officeThe truth is we’ve all been there.  You sit back in your chair and imagine a glorious middle-finger waving scene to your entire office – or something slightly more poetic, like in Jerry Maguire.

It’s a pretty good sign you’re burned out.

I started getting to that point last year.  After a year of intense, “new job” dedication and planning my own wedding I was ready to punch a wall.  This is how I overcame my burnout.

Go to a conference – one where you don’t have to work the booth

I attended my very first conference last year.  Of course I’ve been to dozens over the years, but I’ve never gotten past the expo hall.

In 2016, I got to go to Marketing Profs’ B2B Marketing Forum.

Each quarter I write a new marketing plan and on the last slide, after I’ve spent 1.5 hours talking about all the crazy things I’m going to do for the next 3 months, I make an ask.  Just 1 thing.  In Q2 I asked to go to a conference for marketers.  I listed 3 I was interested in and how much they would cost.  My argument was clear and well planned.  I need to stay up-to-date in my field so I can keep doing my job to the best of my ability.

I was quite shocked when my VP approved it with the flip of a wrist.  To him it was a no brainer – which makes me incredibly lucky.  But the thing I realized is that I had never actually asked to go to a marketing conference before – so no one had ever sent me to one.

PRO TIP: You miss out on every trip you don’t ask for.

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Me at the Old North Church

As I walked in the doors I had no idea what to expect.  I had never been to Boston before.  I went to the conference alone and knew no one.

The first evening was a “Welcome Home” happy hour.  I wore what I always wear.  A pair of jeans, a tee-shirt, a blazer and colorful glasses.  (Liz Lemon is my spirit animal.)  At the office I stand out pretty hard… but not there.  I was among my people.  Everyone looked, talked and thought just like me.  I wasn’t the crazy marketing lady – I was just Ms. Awesome walking around in a sea of equally awesome colleagues.

The week was invigorating!  I went to 4 or 5 sessions a day and chattered my company after each one – painstakingly documenting all the amazing things I had learned or heard.

There were workshops on comedy writing for B2B marketers, Q&As with CMOs, networking events with thousands of marketers just like me.  I even performed “Shoop” in front of 300 people on a whim – and nailed it.  It was like a breathe of fresh air.  I was surrounded by my people.

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Me performing for the “troops” at Laugh Boston Comedy Club

I came back to work completely renewed.  I was a force to be reckoned with.  I was taking on new challenges and felt more inspired than ever.  Even if you don’t end up going to this particular conference (#mpb2b) I recommend that you attend a conference this year – even if it’s just for 2 days in your home town.  Leave the office, don’t answer your email and talk to people who totally get you.

Special Note: Marketing Profs was in no way associated with this article and absolutely did not pay me, in any way, to write it.

And now for your viewing pleasure…